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Tau Beta Pi announces 2017-2018 Teaching Honor Roll

Tau Beta Pi announces 2017-2018 Teaching Honor Roll

The honor society’s award program, now in its second year, recognizes 12 faculty members in the School of Engineering for excellence in teaching.
June 21, 2018

The Stanford chapter of the Tau Beta Pi engineering honor society is proud to announce the 2017-2018 Teaching Honor Roll, which recognizes 12 educators in the School of Engineering for their extraordinary teaching and commitment to students and mentorship. Faculty are selected through an electronic survey open to all students in the school. The honorees reflect a broad range of backgrounds and disciplines.

The Stanford chapter of Tau Beta Pi is composed of 150 members, who represent the top students by GPA in the School of Engineering. The goal of the society is to promote and recognize great teaching at the undergraduate level through ongoing award and recognition efforts – particularly teaching, as it offers students the chance to give back to their most committed teachers, says Tim Schnabel, PhD candidate in Bioengineering.

“Being a good teacher is extremely difficult and requires a huge amount of passion and dedication,” he says. “The best teachers affect the career trajectories of their students in almost every possible way.”

This year’s honorees include:

Alexander R. Dunn - Chemical Engineering
Allison M. Okamura - Mechanical Engineering
Chris Edwards - Mechanical Engineering
Chris Piech - Computer Science
Christopher Gregg - Computer Science
Dwight G. Nishimura - Electrical Engineering
Jan Liphardt - Bioengineering
Jerry Cain - Computer Science
John K. Eaton - Mechanical Engineering
Joseph M. Kahn - Electrical Engineering
Margot Gerritsen - Energy Resource Engineering
Paul Mitiguy - Mechanical Engineering

Honorees will receive an official certificate and will be featured on the Tau Beta Pi Honor Roll website. This year’s 12 honorees will also be recognized by a plaque displayed on the ground floor of the Huang Engineering Center.

“As the award is now in its second year and expanding in impact, we want to move toward not only recognizing great teaching, but also emphasizing the value of diversity that different backgrounds and identities of teachers bring to the Stanford community,” says Schnabel. He hopes to continue efforts toward more inclusivity in the coming years.